News: Peabody Essex Museum Acquires Eighteenth-Century Indian Textile Collection

Peabody Essex Museum - New Indian Textile Collection

The Peabody Essex Museum (PEM) in Salem, Massachusetts has acquired a rare collection of eighteenth-century Indian textiles that are in such spectacular condition that you’d be forgiven for thinking they were made yesterday. Made in the early 1700s for export to the Netherlands, the cotton chintz textiles include jackets, men’s dressing gowns (banyans), women’s dressing gowns (wentkes), children’s caps and bed coverlets known as palampores, both hand-painted and embroidered.

There are about 170 textiles in the collection, all assembled by historian Alida Eecen-van Setten between 1927 and 1969. Some she bought from antiques dealers, others she scavenged from the trash, documenting every acquisition in her ‘chintz book’. She shared her collection with fabric designers who used the patterns in their creations and with other historians, keeping the chintz book current as new research suggested different dates. After her death, her granddaughter Lieke Veldman-Planten took charge of the textiles and the book. The collection is named after both women: the Veldman-Eecen Collection.

In 2015, the Peabody Essex Museum will partner with the Rijksmuseum for an exhibition about the Dutch East India Company’s vast and influential trade in Asian imports. The Veldman-Eecen Collection will feature prominently in the Asia in Amsterdam exhibition that will run in Amsterdam from October 16th 2015 until January 17th 2016, after which it will travel to the Peabody Essex in the USA.

Read more about this new acquisition here.

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