Event: Select Items from the Siam Society’s Textile Collection

 

Event date: Saturday 22 September, 2018, 10:00.

Among the rare artefacts collected under the custodianship of the Siam Society, the textile collection is prominent. It comprises items from various parts of mainland Southeast Asia, ranging from pieces belonging to the aristocratic class to tribal items, pieces extending from secular textiles to those created for ceremonial use. During this presentation, Thai Textile Society members and guests will have the opportunity to view selected pieces from the Society’s textile collection, including Shan aristocratic winter jackets, Tai Hun tube skirts and more.

Khun Ake (Thweep Rittinaphakorn) is curator of the Siam Society’s textiles collection, and an independent scholar whose main research focus is on textiles and art history, particularly of Myanmar, the Shan states and Thailand. He was guest speaker at the Siam Society, National Museum Volunteers group, as well as the Thai Textile Society. Khun Ake has also presented his research work on Shan royal costumes and Burmese silk tapestry woven textiles at international conferences and various other events.

Venue: The Siam Society, 4th floor, 131 Asoke Montri Road, Sukhumvit Soi 21

For more information and to reserve a place contact:  bkk.tts@gmail.com

 

 

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Event: Religious Textiles of Southeast Asia

Event date: Saturday 15 September, 2018, 13:00.

In Southeast Asia, textiles are often made by women for the purpose of donation to the local monastery; the textiles are then displayed in monastery buildings or on their grounds. The donations bring the women merit, which is important for Buddhist practice. These displays also give the women a chance to show off their weaving skills and have their work appreciated by others. This talk by Rebecca Hall will concentrate on Buddhist textiles in mainland Southeast Asia, with specific attention paid to the countries of Thailand, Laos, and Cambodia, and is held in conjunction with the just opened exhibition, Ceremonies and Celebrations which she curated. The focus will be on Buddhist banners, their form, and meaning, but will also include other kinds of textiles made and donated at monasteries. The motifs and scenes woven into the textiles are related to Buddhist beliefs and popular stories and help provide insight into the beliefs of laity across the region.

This event is run by the Textile Museum Associates of Southern California, but it is also open to non-members – museum admission fee applies.

Location: USC-Pacific Asia Museum, 46 N. Los Robles Ave. Pasadena, CA 91101. Time 13:00

(Limited Free Parking adjacent to the Museum)

Exhibition: Oceania

Exhibition dates: 29 September – 10 December 2018

In 1768 Captain James Cook left Plymouth on HMS Endeavour on the first of three voyages. Across the Pacific he encountered a world that was both highly sophisticated and, thanks to ocean-going canoes and navigational aids, interconnected – despite the significant distances between islands. Oceania draws on rich and well-documented historic collections to explore this history and, in so doing, presents new contexts in which these objects can be better understood and appreciated.

With a focus on art made in the Oceanic region by Pacific Islanders, the exhibition is organised around three main themes: ‘Voyaging’ looks at life on the water as revealed through the extraordinary stories of indigenous navigation and the arts of the canoe and canoe accoutrements such as carved prows and paddles. ‘Place-making’ explores the settlement of communities; and ‘Encounter’ focuses on trade and exchange in Pacific cultures. Highlights of the exhibition include a 14th-century wooden Kaitaia carving (from the Auckland War Memorial Museum, Auckland), which was excavated in 1920. This is one of the oldest known objects to have been found in New Zealand to date.

Oceania will bring together around 200 exceptional works from public and private collections worldwide, and will span over 500 years. Highlights include shell, greenstone and ceramic ornaments, huge canoes and stunning god images . The exhibition draws from rich historic ethnographic collections dating from the 18th century to the present, and includes seminal works produced by contemporary artists exploring history, identity and climate change.

For more information visit the website of the Royal Academy of Arts, London.

Exhibition: Ceremonies and Celebrations – Textile Treasures from the USC Pacific Asia Museum Collection

 

Exhibition: 14 September 2018 – 6 January 2019

This exhibition is drawn from the museum’s extraordinary collection of over 2,700 costumes and textiles from China, Korea, Japan, India, the Himalayas and Southeast Asia.

Ceremonies and Celebrations explores interesting ideas that connect these vast regions together. The exhibition is divided into four thematic sections: the first focuses on the connection between gender and textile production and the way that textiles are used to identify gender roles in society. The second idea that is explored in the exhibition is the role of textiles as a signifier of one’s status. The third theme illustrates the unique relationship between textiles and religions across Asia. The final section looks at textiles worn or used in marking ceremonies and life transitions, including birth, weddings, and death.

Some of the highlights of the exhibition will be the imperial dragon robes worn by China’s emperors and imperial family during the Qing dynasty (1644-1911). These robes feature nine powerful dragons, the symbol of the Emperor, embroidered or woven across the front and back of the silk robes. The yellow robes were the rarest of all, since the colour yellow, symbolising the sun, was worn exclusively by the Emperor. One such yellow robe, worn by the Guangxu Emperor (1875-1908) as a boy, will be on display in the galleries.

Also included in the exhibition are magnificent whal-ot (wedding robes) from Korea, a recent gift to the museum, and Japanese kimono and kesa (Buddhist priest robes), some dating to the Edo period (1603-1868). From Southeast Asia, Indonesian ikat textiles, and pineapple-fibre, or Piña cloth from the Philippines will be on display. From South Asia and the Himalayan region, visitors can see colourful tunics and elegant silk robes from India, as well as highly meaningful and richly decorated cloth from the kingdom of Bhutan in the Himalayas.

For more information visit the website of the Pacific Asia Museum, Pasadena, California.

Event: Textiles events in Norfolk

 

Norfolk is definitely the place to be this weekend!

It’s World Textile Day East at Mundford near Thetford and OATG members David and Sue Richardson of Asian Textile Studies will be giving a presentation on the fantastic textiles of the Indonesian island of Sumba. Yuza Sashiko Guild will be there from Japan, so you can find out how to stitch traditional hitomezashi sashiko and even have a go yourself! They recently participated in the World Shibori Symposium and will be exhibiting some pieces from their May exhibition in Yamagata city. The highlight for many visitors will be the Fair Trade market featuring Slow Loris (Chinese textiles), The African Fabric Shop, Textile Traders (mainly Asian textiles), Susan Briscoe (Japanese textiles), Tukuru Textiles (South America), and OATG member John Gillow (pictured above) with his usual eclectic selection.

Two venues in Norwich with an emphasis on textiles will be taking part in the annual Heritage Open Days – the Old Skating Rink and the Textile Conservation Studio. The Old Skating Rink is the home of the South Asian Decorative Arts and Crafts Collection with some fantastic pieces from across South Asia, including India, Pakistan, Burma, northern Thailand and Indonesia. The National Trust Textile Conservation Studio is housed in a converted barn complex where their specialist facilities enable them to treat the most significant and complex textile objects. Their conservators are a skilled and flexible team, undertaking textile conservation work for the whole of the National Trust and private clients. This is a rare opportunity to see important and unique historic textiles up close and personal and learn how they are cared for.

So many great things to see – why not make a weekend of it?

 

Event: World Textile Day East

 

 

Event date: Saturday 8 September 2018, 10:00-16:30

The very idea of World Textile Day was hatched in Norfolk when Magie Relph and Bob Irwin took the African Fabric Shop ‘on safari’ there back in 2005. As more world textiles experts joined the team, they outgrew their first home in Mileham and found the perfect alternative in Mundford.  Join them and their special guest speakers OATG members Sue and David Richardson of Asian Textile Studies.

FREE admission to the exhibition of woven, printed and embroidered textiles.

FAIR TRADE MARKET from makers, workshops and villages around the world

  • 11 am PRESENTATION. Sue and David Richardson – experts in Asian textiles. The Ikat Weaving of Sumba: A Co-operative Venture.
  • 2 pm A FAVOURITE TEXTILE. The experts discuss one of their most treasured textiles. Plus: a short talk.
  • £3 per session or £5 for both, tickets at the door
  • Specialist world textiles traders
  • Disabled access
  • Free parking

For more details of this event in Mundford, Norfolk, visit the World Textile Day website

Article: Culture of Jiasha, Chinese Buddhist Robes

 

Intertwined with the history of Buddhism in China, which dates back to the first century BC and has shaped the country’s culture, politics and art, jiasha, the robes worn by Buddhist monks, are an integral part of China’s material culture. Despite their significance, jiasha have been largely overlooked by historians, partly because so few examples exist today.

Jiasha are patchwork-like robes made by stitching smaller pieces of cloth together before applying decoration. The draped garment design is emblematic of monastic robes worn in India, the birthplace of Buddhism, and elsewhere in Asia. Rectangular in shape with an angled top edge, jiasha are traditionally worn draped over the left shoulder, with the addition of a single hook to fasten the robe around the torso.

Custom dictated that a jiasha was presented to monks in China on the occasion of their ordination. As such, the textile was made to be a material manifestation of Buddhist teachings and ideology. This begins with the construction of the garment. Jiasha are made by piecing together sections of cloth donated from members of the community in a patchwork-style design. Unlike patchwork, the arrangement of panels is very specific, influenced by the Buddhist mandala motif, with a core centre and flowing symmetry. The modest cut of the jiasha and pieced-together appearance references the rags worn by the Buddha during his ascetic period.

To read the full article by Emily Lush and Alan Kennedy visit the website of The Textile Atlas

Event: Turkish Legacy in Anatolian Kilims

Event date: 5 September 2018 at 18:30

 

 

This lecture by Sumru Belger Krody, senior curator at the Textile Museum, Washington DC shows how nomadic Anatolian women, descended from Turkmen nomads, wove colourful, visually stunning kilims that reveal their culture’s aesthetic preferences for decorating their surroundings. Today, these kilims are the only surviving tangible evidence of their makers’ nomadic lifestyle – a poignant legacy given that women generally did not have an external voice in this patriarchal society. The exhibition A Nomad’s Art: Kilims of Anatolia will be open before the talk.

This lecture is free, but reservations are required. For more details of this event held at the Textile Museum, Washington DC, click here

 

Event: Unpicking Woven Heritage – Cultural narratives of handwoven eri silk textiles from Meghalaya, Northeast India

 

 

Event date: Tuesday 4 September 2018 18:00 – 20:00

Anna-Louise Meynell (Centre for Sustainable Fashion, University of the Arts London) has been conducting doctoral research in the remote state of Meghalaya, Northeast India. The research aims to explore and define the cultural heritage of eri silk weaving in the Ri Bhoi District, considering the socio-cultural history, the craft process and the materiality of the product.

Eri silk holds many social narratives of North East India. It is cultivated domestically and known locally as “the poor man’s silk” or “peace silk”, as it does not harm the silkworm in the extraction of the silk. Unlike the continuous filament of the mulberry silk cocoon, the eri cocoon is made up of short staple fibres which require it to be hand spun, resulting in a slubby texture with a dull sheen of silk. It is still almost exclusively dyed with natural dyes and traditionally woven on a simple bamboo floor loom.

The eri silk communities of Meghalaya have been exposed to significant social change and external interventions since pre-colonial times, much of which can be ‘read’ through a study of the textiles and techniques. Anna-Louise will show photos and samples from the archive of eri silk textiles that has been collected during fieldwork – samples that are indicators of tribal migration and assimilation, of colonial influence and widespread conversion from the indigenous Khasi religion to Christianity.  

For further details and booking click here

This Oxford Asian Textile Group event will take place at the Pauling Centre, Oxford.

Event: The Dark Side of the Textile Trade – From the Silk Road to Today

 

Event date: Saturday 18 August 2018, 10am

Throughout history, textiles have always been one of the most valued components of international trade. Therefore, both individuals and states have sought to profit from this trade in both illegal and immoral ways. The problem of counterfeit products is not new, but was already an issue centuries ago, when British traders flooded the Venetian market with their products labelled “Made in Venice.” When cochineal was the most valuable product out of the New World, many pirates and traders sought to acquire cochineal and break the Spanish monopoly. The photo above shows strands from Persian rugs from Iran which had heroin woven into them.

This survey of illicit trade will discuss the abuses of the textile trade for both commercial and political objectives. Dr. Louise Shelley will reveal a largely unknown story of crime and often state-sponsored criminal trade. Dr Shelley is a University Professor at George Mason University, and Director of the Terrorism, Transnational Crime and Corruption Center (TraCCC), Washington, D.C. and a board member of the DC Hajji Baba Society.

This event is part of the regular programme of interesting talks hosted by the Textile Museum Associates of Southern California, Inc and will be held at

Luther Hall, Lower Level St. Bede’s Episcopal Church

3590 Grand View Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90066-1904

This is just south of the 10 freeway, and west of the 405, near the intersection of Centinela and Palms and there is free parking. This event is free for members and $10 for non-members.