Exhibition: Seth Siegelaub – Beyond Conceptual Art

 

Stedelijk Museum - Seth Siegelaub

Exhibition dates: 12 December 2015 – 17 April 2016

He was a gallerist, independent curator, publisher, researcher, archivist, collector and bibliographer. Often billed the ‘father of conceptual art’, Seth Siegelaub was – and remains – a seminal influence on curators, artists and cultural thinkers, internationally and in Amsterdam, where he settled in the 1990s. And now the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam is showing the exhibition ‘Seth Siegelaub: Beyond Conceptual Art’, devoted to the life and work of this fascinating yet still elusive figure.

Seth Siegelaub (1941–2013) is best known for his decisive role in the emergence and establishment of conceptual art in the late 1960s. But he also pursued a lesser-known occupation as a collector of handwoven textiles and bibliographer of books on the social history of textiles. This strand of his activity was eventually consolidated in the Center for Social Research on Old Textiles (CSROT), founded in 1986, and culminated in his authoritative Bibliographica Textilia Historiæ: Towards a General Bibliography on the History of Textiles Based on the Library and Archives of the Center for Social Research on Old Textiles (1997).

Acknowledging the unusual scope and essentially unclassifiable nature of Seth Siegelaub’s manifold interests and activities, the exhibition at the Stedelijk Museum reveals to what extent his projects and collections were underpinned by a deeper concern with printed matter and lists as a way of disseminating ideas. By doing so, it allows the wider public to reassess his role as one of the distinctive characters in twentieth-century exhibition-making while recognising his atypical, inquisitive and free-spirited genius.

For more information, visit the website of the Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam, Netherlands.

Exhibition: Celebrating the Arts of Japan – The Mary Griggs Burke Collection

Met Museum - Celebrating the Arts of Japan

Exhibition dates: 20 October 2015 – 22 January 2017

A spectacular array of Japanese works of art are currently on view at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, in a special exhibition featuring works drawn from the recent landmark gift to the museum by the Mary and Jackson Burke Foundation. ‘Celebrating the Arts of Japan: The Mary Griggs Burke Collection’ is a tribute to the discerning New York City collector who built what is widely regarded as the finest and most encompassing private collection outside Japan. The works on view include masterpieces – paintings, sculpture, ceramics, calligraphy, lacquerware and more – dating from the tenth to the twentieth century. Among the highlights are a powerful representation of the Buddhist deity Fudō Myōō from the studio of the celebrated sculptor Kaikei (active 1185–1223), a sumptuous set of early seventeenth-century screens showing Uji Bridge in Kyoto, and Itō Jakuchū’s (1716–1800) tour-de-force ink painting of plum blossoms in full bloom illuminated by moonlight. Organised by theme and presented in two sequential rotations (with the changeover taking place in late May 2016), the exhibition will reveal, through a single, distinguished collection, the full range of topics, techniques and styles that are distinctive to Japanese art.

Beginning in the 1960s, over the course of nearly 50 years, Mary Griggs Burke (1916–2012) assembled an unparalleled art collection. It was exhibited by the Tokyo National Museum in 1985, the first ever Japanese art collection from abroad to be shown there. The themes selected for the current exhibition, including numerous works added to the collection since the Bridge of Dreams exhibition at the Met in 2000, reflect Mrs Burke’s own collecting interests.

For more information, visit the website of the Metropolitan Museum, New York, USA.