Event: Helen Mears speaks about the James Henry Green Collection at Brighton Museum & Art Gallery for ORTS

Event date: Wednesday 22 November, 7pm

This is an Oriental Rug and Textile Society event.

Colonel James Henry Green assembled a pre-eminent collection of textiles, photographs, notes, books and diaries from the northern hill states of Burma/Myanmar in the 1920s and 30s. In particular, Green’s documentation of life in Kachin State in northern Burma/Myanmar constitutes a rare if not unique visual record of life in this area at this time. In 1992, the James Henry Green Charitable Trust chose Brighton Museum & Art Gallery to be the long-term caretaker of the collection.

Helen Mears is Keeper of World Art at Royal Pavilion & Museums and a lecturer and doctoral student at the University of Brighton. In this talk, she will introduce the Green collection and talk about its continuing relevance to Kachin people in and outside of Burma/Myanmar.

The talk will be held at St James Conference Room, 197 Piccadilly, London W1J 9LL.

The Conference Room entrance is in the Church Place passageway, which runs between Jermyn Street and Piccadilly.  There is a wrought iron gate signed ‘Church Hall Conference Room’ leading downstairs.  Drinks and snacks will be served.

Piccadilly Circus tube is 5 minutes’ walk, and Green Park Tube is 10 minutes’ walk.  There is free parking in St James Square after 6.30pm.

Please note this is an Oriental Rug and Textile Society event, but non-members are welcome to attend: £7 single lecture, £5 students, or choose £20 for one year’s membership (11 events).

For more information, visit the website of the Oriental Rug and Textile Society.

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Textile Tidbits: Tribal Music Asia – Songs of Memory 2016 Update

Songs of Memory - 2016 Update

Today’s Textile Tidbit is a link to the Tribal Music Asia website, and this year’s Songs of Memory update. Although the site focuses mostly on the songs and music of Southeast Asia, there are also a large number of pictures documenting traditional textiles in the areas of Thailand, Laos, Myanmar and China.

This summer’s update includes information about three exhibitions of traditional crafts from these places, and several photographs. I recommend taking a look if you’re not already familiar with the site.

To read more about this project, and to view the exhibition photos, read the 2016 Songs of Memory update, or visit the Tribal Music Asia website.

Exhibition: Art of the Zo – Textiles from Myanmar, India and Bangladesh

Philadelphia Museum of Art - Art of the Zo

Exhibition dates: 11 November 2015 – 20 March 2016

For readers based in the US, there’s still nearly a month left to see this stunning-looking show in Philadelphia.

This exhibition offers a look at beautiful woven textiles of the Zo people of Myanmar, India and Bangladesh. It focuses on traditional weavings worn for daily life and ceremonial occasions, such as weddings, funerals and feasts of merit. The Zo consider weaving to be the highest form of art. They believe their textiles confer status to the weaver and document his or her status in this life and the afterlife. ‘Art of the Zo’ presents how these woven treasures are made and worn, and features twentieth-century examples from specific locality and cultural divisions.

A talented Zo weaver is prized by her community for her skills. Using the most basic of looms, she can create textiles that range from unpatterned indigo-dyed cloth and simple, colourful stripes to complex weaves that could be mistaken for embroidery. Although most Zo have adopted Burmese and Western attire, some embrace traditional weaving techniques in an effort to preserve their culture. This exhibition draws from the Philadelphia Museum’s collection of Zo textiles and loans from Barbara and David Fraser, authors of Mantles of Merit: Chin Textiles from Myanmar, India, and Bangladesh (2005).

In addition to tunics, wrap skirts, mantles, loincloths, capes and blankets, the exhibition includes a loom with a partially woven cloth next to a finished example from the museum’s collection. A video presentation, photographic details of selected works, and graphics of specific weave structures further demonstrate the virtuosic skill of Zo weavers.

For more information, visit the website of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, USA.