Exhibition: Kind Words Can Never Die

textile-museum-of-canada-kind-words-can-never-die

Exhibition dates: 22 February – 25 June 2017

Kind Words Can Never Die presents an extraordinary collection of Victorian needlework mottos stitched by anonymous women and girls in the mid to late nineteenth century. Mass produced by American wholesale companies, standardised sheets of perforated cardboard were printed with messages such as biblical quotes, song titles and popular maxims of the time that reflected the cultural and religious milieu of the North American evangelical Protestant middle class: ‘Do Right and Fear Not’; ‘What is Home Without a Mother?’; ‘Kind Words Can Never Die’. Women ordered the mottos from mail order catalogues, stitched them using a simple satin stitch and hung them in the home in specially designed motto frames.

With the rise of industrial manufacturing, men worked outside the home in growing numbers, setting established home and family structures into flux. Women increasingly took control of domestic space as consumers and moral influencers. Their decisions of which mottos to stitch and hang on the walls declared which of society’s ethical, cultural and religious edicts would guide the aesthetic and moral tone of the home. As objects of material culture, the mottos attest to the work women did to cultivate carefully chosen personal and social values in their families.

This particular collection of mottos was built by Jane Webster (1919–2009) from the mid to late twentieth century at her home in the Caribou Harbour area of Pictou, Nova Scotia. Family photos of the interior of the home taken in the 1940s show a few mottos on the wall ­— just enough to spark a collector’s passion in Jane, who had recently started spending time at the house. Jane purchased the mottos from farm auctions and received them as gifts, eventually amassing 173 examples that represent the vast majority of available motto texts. In Jane’s possession, the mottos were relieved of their purpose as edifying agents and re-contextualised as curious objects displayed in the spirit of generosity, welcoming and wit.

For more information, visit the website of the Textile Museum of Canada, Toronto.

Event: REMINDER – Clare Pollard Talks about Ornamental Meiji Textiles at the National Museum of Ireland

OATG - Clare Pollard Talks about Meiji Textiles

Japanese fukusa wrapping cloth; silk embroidered with gold and coloured silk, c. 1878, National Museum of Ireland, 1879.204. © National Museum of Ireland.

Event date: Wednesday 28 September 2016, 4.15 – 5pm (viewing), 5.15pm (presentation)

This is just a reminder about the OATG event taking place next Wednesday, comprising a viewing of late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century decorative Japanese textiles from the Ashmolean Museum’s collection, followed by a presentation by Dr Clare Pollard on discoveries made during a recent visit to Dublin.

Dr Clare Pollard is Curator of Japanese Art at the Ashmolean Museum of Art and Archaeology, Oxford. She has previously worked as Curator of the East Asian Collections at the Chester Beatty Library in Dublin.

Location: Ashmolean Museum, Jameel Centre Study Room 1 (for the viewing) and Ashmolean Museum Education Centre (for the presentation).

Admission is free for members, £3 for non-members. Registration is essential.

For more information, and to book your place at this event, please contact the OATG events organisers (oatg.events@gmail.com).

Event: Clare Pollard Talks about Ornamental Meiji Textiles at the National Museum of Ireland

OATG - Clare Pollard Talks about Meiji Textiles

Japanese fukusa wrapping cloth; silk embroidered with gold and coloured silk, c. 1878, National Museum of Ireland, 1879.204. © National Museum of Ireland.

Event date: Wednesday 28 September 2016, 4.15 – 5pm (viewing), 5.15pm (presentation)

The OATG has organised a viewing later this month of late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century decorative Japanese textiles from the Ashmolean Museum’s collection, followed by a presentation by Dr Clare Pollard on discoveries made during a recent visit to Dublin.

Dr Clare Pollard is Curator of Japanese Art at the Ashmolean Museum of Art and Archaeology, Oxford. She has previously worked as Curator of the East Asian Collections at the Chester Beatty Library in Dublin.

Location: Ashmolean Museum, Jameel Centre Study Room 1 (for the viewing) and Ashmolean Museum Education Centre (for the presentation).

Admission is free for members, £3 for non-members. Registration is essential.

For more information, and to book your place at this event, please contact the OATG events organisers (oatg.events@gmail.com).

Exhibition: Sharing History. Arab World – Europe 1815–1918

Sharing History - Arab World, Europe

Over the course of three years, museum curators and historians from twenty-two countries have worked together to depict, for the first time, a core period of their shared history as a common historical legacy that takes into account the specific perspectives of all parties.

The results are ten international online exhibitions exploring themes of central importance to Arab-Ottoman-European relations in the nineteenth century. The exhibitions show a rich spectrum of art works, documents, historical photographs and everyday objects as well as buildings and locations from the participating countries. Numerous objects have now been made accessible to the public for the first time, along with all of the material gathered within the framework of Sharing History that documents our common past.

The project, initiated by Museum With No Frontiers (MWNF), is the first attempt to specifically address Arab-Ottoman-European history in a way that includes all parties. The research at the start of the project thus brought unexpected discoveries for many of the partners about the diversity and intensity of our relations in the nineteenth century and the cultural heritage documenting this period of our common history. A potential upon which we can build a common future, and an experience that bears witness to the fact that there is far more connecting us than we realise.

To design the exhibitions, the curators of the partner institutions had access to a database of 2,490 objects specially brought together for this project. Visitors to the virtual museum can use this database to conduct further research or compile personal collections.

To view the exhibition online, visit the Sharing History website.