Upcoming textile events – Peru, Mexico, China, the Silk Road and more….

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I really enjoyed an online talk about the Peru exhibition at the British Museum by curators Jago Cooper and Cecilia Pardo-Grau. I’ve been informed by longstanding OATG member Pamela Cross that there are some fantastic textiles in this exhibition.

I was amazed to see this feather headdress from the Chimú-Inca culture, and enjoyed learning more about the process of preparing it for display.

I recently blogged about a talk by Elena Phipps as part of the Curator’s Choice series at the Fowler Museum. This particular talk was about Feather Embellishments in Mexican Huipiles and it is now available on Youtube for those who missed it.

Phoenix – a traditional festival badge by Margaret Lee

The Asian Arts Society of Australia (TAASA) has an interesting online event this week.

“Every culture in the world has some form of embroidery in their history but nowhere else has it played such a visible and significant role than in Chinese culture. With a history tracing back to the Neolithic period, embroidery has a continuous position that permeates every echelon and aspect of Chinese society, adapting with the times and, in the process, has itself developed from the fundamental purpose of decoration to fine art status. In this presentation [embroidery specialist] Margaret Lee shares with us key milestones of embroidery’s journey and its central place in Chinese history and culture.” – TAASA website.

This free event takes place on Tuesday 30 November at 18:30, which is 04:30 in the UK, so it only really works for our members in the Southern Hemisphere.

On Thursday 2 December Virginia Postrel will explore the hidden ways textiles have made our world. “The story of humanity is the story of textiles – as old as civilization itself. Textiles created empires and powered invention. They established trade routes and drew nations’ borders. Since the first thread was spun, fabric has driven technology, business, politics, and culture.”

Virginia is the author of The Fabric of Civilization: How Textiles Made The World. This online event begins at 18:00 GMT and you can register for it here.

The next online meeting of the Hajji Baba Club of New York will be on Wednesday 8 December. Dr Mariachiara Gasparini will talk on the subject From Wool to Silk and Back: Development and Evolution of the Eurasian Roundel Motif.

“In the 6th century, roundel motifs began to appear on wool and silk textiles in Chinese and Iranian territories. Through the spreading of Buddhism and Islam in the 8th century, textiles with beaded, lobed, and flowery roundels spread across Eurasia; they have been found in Christian Cathedral treasuries, Egyptian and Japanese repositories, and various archaeological sites. Often used as money by the Chinese, these textiles mainly crossed the borders of empires and kingdoms as diplomatic gifts.”

The talk begins at 18:00 EST, which is 23:00 GMT and is free, but you do need to register for it.

On Thursday 8 December the Fashion and Textile Museum, London, will host another online talk, this time with Victoria Finlay, the author of Fabric: The Hidden History of the Material World. Victoria looks at how stories of our “relationship with cloth are woven in with questions of how and why people through the ages have made it, worn it, invented it, made symbols out of it, and sometimes why they have fought for it.”

Beating tree bark in Papua and attempting to spin cotton in Guatemala are just two of the textile-related experiences Victoria has had, so this should be an enjoyable talk.

Click here to find out more and to book for this talk which begins at 18:00 GMT.

Focus on conservation

Sufiyan Ismail Khatri. ©two circles

Next Friday, 20 September, the Met Museum in New York will be hosting a Textile Conservation Colloquium focussing on recent research.

Participants will “gain an inside perspective on the fascinating work of The Met’s Department of Textile Conservation. From investigating silk production in Japan and block printing in India to conserving precious tapestries and exploring applications for new technologies, conservators share their research and discoveries from the past year.” – The Met website.

In the afternoon there will be a demonstration of traditional Indian block printing by Sufiyan Ismail Khatri, a tenth-generation artisan whose family has been involved in the art of Ajrakh printing since the fifteenth century.

Advance registration is required for this event as space is limited. For more details and booking for this free event click here.

Photo ©TAASA

The Asian Arts Society of Australia (TAASA) recently met with textile conservation expert Kate Chidlow from the Museum of Applied Arts and Sciences. The Powerhouse Museum in Sydney forms part of this museum. They looked at a variety of conservation-related topics such as how to protect home textile collections from the negative effects of insects, PVC or cardboard, folding, pressure, sunlight and time. The MAAS website has a series of excellent information sheets which you can download, which will help you learn how to best care for your textiles. These include How to store a fragile garment in an acid-free box, How to create rolled storage for flat textiles, How to brush vacuum an object, and many more.

Another good source of information on caring for your textiles is the Threads of Life Gallery, based in Ubud, Bali. Take a look at their practical hints and tips here.

Maria working on an Egyptian mummy. © National Museums Scotland

On a lighter note I really enjoyed reading this blog by Maria Armstrong, former Assistant Textile Conservator at National Museums Scotland on things you might not know about working as a conservator – apparently it requires very strong core muscles!

 

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