News: Textile Museum Journal Relaunched

After a hiatus of more than ten years, The George Washington University Museum and The Textile Museum are pleased to announce the relaunch of the Textile Museum Journal.

Established in 1962, the Textile Museum Journal is the leading publication for the exchange of textile scholarship in North America. The peer-reviewed journal promotes high-quality research on the cultural, technical, historical and aesthetic significance of textiles from Asian, African and indigenous American cultures. Last issued in 2004, the journal resumed annual publication last month, thanks to a Founding Patron gift from the Markarian Foundation, and is now available in an online format.

Table of Contents
Textile Museum Journal, Volume 44

Toward a Grammar of Textiles: A Reconsideration of Medieval Textile Aesthetics and the Impact of Modern Collecting
Arielle Winnik

Nomad Textile Bags from Central Asia in the 19th and 20th Centuries: Geographic Distribution, Decoration, Semantics
Irina Bogoslovskaya

Through the Renaissance Frame: Carpets and the Beginnings of ‘Islamic Art’ in Nineteenth-Century Vienna and Berlin
Denise-Marie Teece

Pope Innocent VIII’s Mamluk Carpets from Cairo in Context: Their Manufacture and Acquisition
Rosamond E. Mack

Rethinking Mamluk Carpet Origins
Gerald Pollio

For more information, visit the website of the Textile Museum, Washington DC.

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Event: Lecture – Change and Tradition in Soviet Central Asia

GW Textile Museum - Old Patterns- Lecture

Event date: 28 April 2016, 6pm

Textiles have been part of Central Asian identity for hundreds of years, peaking in the nineteenth century with the production of ikats that featured bold, original designs and vibrant colours. In the twentieth century, the Soviet Union came to power, bringing economic change and “modernization” to the region. Join the Textile Museum on 28 April for a lecture by expert Andrew Hale on the influence of revolutionary Russia on Central Asia’s textile and other traditions.

Hale is a collector, curator, and internationally recognised expert in the nomadic textiles and silk-weaving traditions of Central Asia, as well as the author of numerous articles and books on Central Asian art. During his talk, he will pull from his personal archive of over two thousand photographs documenting this region in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

This lecture explores themes from the exhibition ‘Old Patterns, New Order: Socialist Realism in Central Asia’, open until 29 May.

For more information, visit the website of the GW Textile Museum, Washington DC, USA.

News: Les musées des Tissus et des Arts décoratifs de Lyon threatened with closure

Les Musees des tissus et des arts decoratifs de Lyon

The Musée des tissus in Lyon is in a very difficult situation: last year, the French government decided to withdraw subsidies from the country’s Chambers of Commerce and Industry (we are talking here about more than 500 million euros). For the Chambre de Commerce de Lyon this meant that they could no longer support the textile museum, for which they have been responsible since 1854. It was hoped (and there have been negotiations to that end) that either the city of Lyon or the French Ministry of Culture would step in – but they are reluctant to take on the responsibility. If we cannot resolve this situation, the museum will be closed at the beginning of next year. (Please understand that this is an abbreviated version of what’s happening. For a detailed account, visit the link below.)

On Monday, a petition was launched that has been signed by more than 10,000 people so far. I have included a link to this petition below (the English text will become visible if you click ‘Read more’ at the end of the French introduction), and the museum and its community would be very grateful if you could sign it and spread the news among your friends and colleagues.

The Musée des tissus de Lyon is one of the most important, if not the most important collection of textiles in the world; it is a treasure trove, a mine of inspiration, a centre for research and the home of CIETA (Centre International d’Etude des Textiles Anciens) – please help us save it!

For more information, please visit the website of La Tribune de l’Art (website in French).

To sign the petition, visit the Change.org petition page here.