Yet more textile events!

I don’t usually write another blog so soon after a major one, but discovered these upcoming talks and exhibitions which I wanted to share.

 

 

On 18 January the Thai Textile Society will hold another Collector’s Corner event in Bangkok, the subject of which will be Guatemala Rainbow: The Most Colourful Textiles in the World. It will focus on the collection of Professor Douglas Sanders, a retired Canadian lawyer and law professor who travelled to Latin America in the 1970s for the World Council of Indigenous Peoples.

“Guatemala is one of only two countries in Latin America with majority indigenous Indian populations. In the summer of 1975 Douglas Sanders studied Spanish in the village of Huehuetenango, in the Mayan Indian hill areas of western Guatemala. With other students, he travelled to weekend markets, marvelling at the colourful weaving and embroidery. Each village had its own ‘typical’ – distinct clothing and designs. It was a lovely placid summer, coming after a period of civil war – and before another period of violence. Douglas’s collection will give a visual sense of a fascinating textile tradition that includes women’s blouses, men’s shirts, blankets, carrying cloths and ornamental hangings.” – Thai Textile Society website. For further details visit the Thai Textile Society website.

Details

Saturday 18 January 2020, 10:00am
Bandara Suites Silom, 4th floor conference room, first building, 75/1 Soi Saladaeng 1, Bangkok
Non-members welcome for a small charge.

For reservations please contact the Thai Textile Society.

 

Bamileke beaded shirt from Cameroon made of raffia and cotton.

Also on 18 January, but over in the USA, is a new exhibition on African Apparel: Threaded Transformations Across The 20th Century. This exhibition is mainly drawn from the extensive collection of Norma Canelas Roth and William Roth. It will include hand-woven and dyed textiles (for example bogolanfini mud cloth from Mali, adire indigo cloth from Nigeria, and kente cloth from Ghana) alongside factory-woven and machine-printed cloth (such as wax-print from West and Central Africa, kanga from East Africa, and shwe shwe from South Africa). Lots of examples of amber, silver jewellery and beadwork will also be on display. To learn more about the exhibition visit the website of the museum.

The exhibition has been guest curated by MacKenzie Moon Ryan. Click here for further details of his curator-led tour on Friday 24 January.

Details

18 January – 17 May 2020
Rollins Cornell Fine Arts Museum, 1000 Holt Avenue – 2765, Winter Park, Florida.

 

Detail from panel with stepped design. Peru, North Coast. Late Intermediate Period, 1150–1450 CE. Fowler Museum, © Elena Phipps

At the end of this month The Pre-Columbian Society of New York will host a lecture by Elena Phipps of the Metropolitan Museum of Art on the subject of Andean Textile Traditions: Materials, Materiality, and Culture.

“The development of rich and complex Andean textile traditions spanned millennia, in concert with the development of cultures that utilised textiles as a primary form of expression and communication. Knowing the importance of textiles in the Andean world, we can examine elements of their genesis and look at the trajectory from the earliest developments of fibre-made items to the extraordinarily complex masterpieces of textile arts. Understanding the processes by which this was achieved, challenging enough in their material and technical features, is part of a larger cultural dialogue about the relationship between textiles as objects of use and function, and their physical and material qualities. These represent cultural choices and constitute systems of knowledge and values, underscored in the material and materiality of the media.” PCSNY website. For further details and booking please click here.

I felt it was worth repeating this section below from my November blog as it ties in so well with Elena’s talk:

One of the techniques in which the creators of Andean textiles excelled was cross looping. In this blog for the Cooper Hewitt Elena Phipps examines this fragment of a border (probably for a simple shoulder mantle) made by Nasca needleworkers from the South Coast of Peru at some time between 100BC and 100AD. The yarns used are from various camelids – llamas, alpacas and possibly vicunas.

Details

30 January 2020, 18:00
The Institute of Fine Arts, 1 East 78th Street, New York

 

 

The China National Silk Museum is currently holding an exhibition  of 66 hats from across Asia. The Asian Hat Collection Donated By Barbara Park exhibition includes hats from Bhutan, Japan, Thailand and Vietnam, which are made using a wide variety of techniques.

A great selection of images from the exhibition can be viewed on the Facebook page of the Friends of the Museum.

“A hat is also an extraordinary storyteller, bearing lots of information such as identity, social role, tradition, history and life. This exhibition dives into the background of these hats, enquiring into the makers and users behind the hats per se.” China National Silk Museum

Details

Until 29 March 2020.
China National Silk Museum, Hangzhou.

 

A new exhibition has just opened at The Dick Institute in Ayrshire entitled Textiles and Memory. Dean Castle, another of Ayrshire’s flagship attractions, is currently undergoing major repair and refurbishment works which are due for completion in 2021. As a result, the Castle’s fabulous and nationally recognised collections of early musical instruments, tapestries and more have been moved to the Dick Institute for safekeeping and are on display in the North Museum.

The exhibition, with which OATG member Emma Dick was heavily involved, celebrates the hidden histories of textile making, the cultural heritage of Ayrshire, and the stories and memories of the women who make up the Dean Castle Textile Team. Click here for more details.

Details

3 December 2019 – 31 December 2020
The Dick Institute, Elmbank Avenue, Kilmarnock, KA1 3BU

 

****************************

 


 

Events: Textile events this week in the UK, Bangkok and New York

It’s a busy week for textile lovers with several interesting talks across a variety of subjects.

Woman’s hat, late 19th century. Photo © Wendel Swan

Tomorrow evening Roger Pratt, a Trustee of The Textile Museum, will give a talk on Selected Hats from the Silk Road as part of the Hajji Baba Club of New York’s ongoing programme. Roger will show and discuss some of the hats from his collection which featured in the exhibition held at the Corcoran Museum last June as part of the International Conference on Oriental Carpets XIV. These will include Turkmen Hats; Turkmen Tekke Hats; Central Asian Non-Turkmen Hats; Persian Conical Dervish Hats; Central Asian Longtail Hats; Inscribed Religious Hats; and Ottoman Syrian Aleppo Hats. 

Early 19th century dervish hat. Photo © Wendel Swan

Location: The Coffee House Club, 20 West 44th St (bet 5th & 6th Ave), 6th Floor, New York NY 10036
Doors open 6:00pm for cocktails, meeting starts at 6:30pm

This event is also open to non-members for a fee. For more information visit the website of the Hajji Baba Club. For those who cannot make it to this talk R. John Howe has given a wonderful overview of the exhibition, along with lots of excellent images on his Eccentric Wefts site here.

Woman’s dress made from alatzia. © Mary Spyrou.

On Wednesday 20 March Mary Spyrou will talk to members of the London-based Oriental Rug and Textile Society (ORTS) on the subject of Cypriot textiles – techniques, materials, patterns, uses and the importance of dowry textiles.

This talk will encompass the wide variety of Cypriot textile traditions, which include weaving, embroidery and lace making – now listed under the UNESCO Intangible cultural heritage of Cyprus. The ORTS website points out :- “Cyprus is located in the eastern corner of the Mediterranean sea, at the cross roads where the west meets the east, settled, conquered and occupied by many civilisations, including Byzantines, Venetians and Ottomans, all of whom have had an influence on the development of the artistic heritage of Cyprus.

The raw materials used – silk, cotton,wool, flax and linen ; the designs and patterns inspired by nature, and the many items made, including garments and domestic furnishings, for example, and especially their role and importance as dowry textiles, part of a rich Folk art tradition which experienced a decline from around the middle of the 20th century will be the main focus of the talk.”

Location: St James Piccadilly Conference Room, 197 Piccadilly, London W1J 9LL

Non-members welcome for a fee. For more details visit the ORTS website.

This Thursday Karen Horton, Independent Textile and Ethnographic Conservator, will give a talk to Oxford Asian Textile Group members on the subject of Lifting the Veil: The Conservation and Mounting of Thangkas at the Chester Beatty Library, Dublin. The talk will focus on the conservation of the Tibetan thangkas textile mounts and the minimal intervention policy that the Chester Beatty Library adheres too. She will discuss the methods and materials used, the ethical implication of conserving sacred textiles and the non-invasive mounting method she designed and developed with her colleagues at the library to install the thangkas allowing them to be displayed with their veils pleated as they would have hung in their Himalayan temple setting.

The Chester Beatty Library Dublin, is an art museum and library that houses the world-class collection of East Asian, European and Islamic art assembled by the great philanthropist and collector Sir Alfred Chester Beatty (1875-1968). The Tibetan collection, which is mainly Buddhist, includes Tibetan sacred texts, ritual objects and forty-eight predominantly nineteenth century thangka’s of which 26 retain their textile mounts.

Karen is currently conserving and researching a group of Ming Dynasty textiles in Xi’an China where she works each year. She is studying for her Ph.D. and her research topic is Tibetan/Chinese Embroidered and Woven Thangka’s and Buddhist Textiles, Collections, Provenance and the Art Maker 1400 to present.

Location: The Pauling Centre, 58a Banbury Road, Oxford OX2 6QS.

Time: 6.00 p.m. (for a 6.15 p.m. start) – 8 p.m.

Non-members welcome for a small fee. Visit the OATG website for more details.

This short video by the Asia Society of New York has some wonderful black and white images of thangkas in use in monasteries. Adriana Proser, the John H. Foster Senior Curator for Traditional Asian Art, also gives an insight into several richly coloured thangkas which formed part of an exhibition called Unknown Tibet: The Tucci Expeditions and Buddhist Painting, which she co-curated with Deborah Klimburg-Salter.

Screenshot from the video by Dawa Drolma. © Smithsonian Institution.

Thangkas have been produced since at least the 14th century and are still being produced today. Some are made from small pieces of fabric and others are painted. This article in the magazine of the Smithsonian Center for Folklife & Cultural Heritage discusses modern thangka production, contrasting the work of dedicated painters who use traditional mineral pigments and have studied the relevant techniques for many years, with thangkas which are mass-produced by companies in factories by printing images on canvas with acrylic paint.

The article includes an excellent video produced by Dawa Drolma which shows all of the steps taken in producing a thangka, beginning with making the actual canvas on which the image will be painted. The painters describe the three different styles of thangka painting and it is a joy to watch them producing these paintings right down to the final gilding.

Thangka held at the Met Museum. © Metropolitan Museum.

Kristine Kamiya, a textile conservator at the Metropolitan Museum in New York, has written a great blog on restoring a particular appliquéd textile thangka. After careful examination with a microscope they discovered that it was made up of lots of different textiles which may even have spanned the duration of the Ching dynasty. The enlarged images showing the use of horsehair to give an extra dimension to the cloth are fascinating.

Saturday 23 March sees two events, luckily in different parts of the globe. World Textile Day Wales, the first World Textile Day of 2019,  will take place in Llanidloes. This will include an exhibition of world textiles, a presentation by Jacqui Carey (Japanese kumihimo expert), a demonstration by Liz Beasley (expert in Chilean dyeing and weaving), a braiding demonstration by the Braid Society and much, much more.

For full details visit the World Textile Day website.

Two examples of 18th century Indian chintz intended for European clientele. © Thweep Rittinaphakorn.

The second event is a talk to the Thai Textile Society in Bangkok by Thweep Rittinaphakorn (known as Ake), on the subject of Export Chintz – The Flagship Indian Trade Cloths. Ake is the curator of the Siam Society textiles collection and an avid textile scholar. 

“India has clothed the world for centuries. Its rich textile heritage has left imprints on and influenced textiles artistic sense and production worldwide. Among all textiles exported from India to other lands, “Chintz” (fine cotton fabric with hand-drawn motifs and details) were the most prized items. Known locally by the technical term of “Kalamkari”, the type produced for export has distinctive characteristics and held high virtue in various ways from its complex production technique, perplexing range of colours, and vast design customisation for different markets they were intended for.  Although in Thailand Indian Chintz has been known to Thai textiles collectors and enthusiasts for years, it was rather limited to only those that were made for the Siamese court. Little is known about the Chintz produced for other markets, both in Southeast Asia as well as in Europe. This talk intends to provide a glimpse of examples of Chintz produced by the Indians for other markets, to provide a basic understanding in the differences from design aspect to usage context.” – Thai Textile Society website.

Location: Bandara Suites Silom, 4th floor conference room, first building 75/1 Soi Saladaeng 1, Bangkok

For further information on this talk, which is also open to non-members, please visit the website of the Thai Textile Society.

 

*******************************

 


 

Event: Select Items from the Siam Society’s Textile Collection

 

Event date: Saturday 22 September, 2018, 10:00.

Among the rare artefacts collected under the custodianship of the Siam Society, the textile collection is prominent. It comprises items from various parts of mainland Southeast Asia, ranging from pieces belonging to the aristocratic class to tribal items, pieces extending from secular textiles to those created for ceremonial use. During this presentation, Thai Textile Society members and guests will have the opportunity to view selected pieces from the Society’s textile collection, including Shan aristocratic winter jackets, Tai Hun tube skirts and more.

Khun Ake (Thweep Rittinaphakorn) is curator of the Siam Society’s textiles collection, and an independent scholar whose main research focus is on textiles and art history, particularly of Myanmar, the Shan states and Thailand. He was guest speaker at the Siam Society, National Museum Volunteers group, as well as the Thai Textile Society. Khun Ake has also presented his research work on Shan royal costumes and Burmese silk tapestry woven textiles at international conferences and various other events.

Venue: The Siam Society, 4th floor, 131 Asoke Montri Road, Sukhumvit Soi 21

For more information and to reserve a place contact:  bkk.tts@gmail.com